Jim Fiscus Shoots 360 Degree Group-Portrait For Ad Campaign

Jim4.jpegIt certainly is a “brave new world” – to paraphrase ad agency, Flying Object – when photography is no longer just a still image made for print, but a moment that can be experienced interactively by the viewer. Renowned commercial photographer, Jim Fiscus, who has created work for entertainment brands such as HBO, CBS and Channel 4, recently got an opportunity to take his photographic skills to the next level; in a collaboration with ad agency Flying Object, celebrating 17 of the U.K.’s most compelling YouTube personalities, Jim got to create a 360-degree photosphere shot which puts the viewer among its 17 subjects, right in the middle of the National Portrait Gallery in London. The portrait can be viewed online (below, through Google Maps) or, if in possession of the “Street View” app, through VR, a.k.a. Virtual Reality. Flying Object’s own explanation of their choice of medium is as follows:

Jim2.jpeg“Interactive, unprintable, native to the web and optimized for mobile through gyrometer integration; 17 creators explorable individually, in a setup that puts the audience right in the middle of things. Oh, brave new world.”

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More information about the shoot can be found in the links below.  Still were taken by both Jim Fiscus and Luca Sage.

https://stocklandmartelblog.com/2016/11/29/jim-fiscus-youtube-creators/
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/2244413/britains-top-youtubers-pose-for-incredible-three-dimensional-photo/

Visit Altpick and Jim Fiscus‘ website for more of Jim’s work.

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Sending a Gift of Peace and Joy This Holiday Season

©Alberto Ruggieri

©Alberto Ruggieri

Wishing you, your friends and family a joyous holiday season filled with love, light and peace.  Enjoy some of the Altpick members’ holiday images:

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©Eddie Guy

©Eddie Guy

©Stefano Morri

©Stefano Morri

©Lynn Wellsand

©Lynn Wellsand

©Kristofer dan Bergman

©Kristofer dan Bergman

©Caitlin Alexander

©Caitlin Alexander

©David Owens

©David Owens

©Craig LaRotonda

©Craig LaRotonda

©Paul Garland

©Paul Garland

©Umberto Grati

©Umberto Grati

©Urs Knobel

©Urs Knobel

©Shane Kislack

©Shane Kislack

©Daria Kirpach

©Daria Kirpach

©Colleen O'Hara

©Colleen O’Hara

©Jing Jing Tsong

©Jing Jing Tsong

©Davide Bonazzi

©Davide Bonazzi

©Huan Tran

©Huan Tran

©Keith Barraclough

©Keith Barraclough

©Jeff Hinchee

©Jeff Hinchee

©Steven Dana

©Steven Dana

©Whitney Lane

©Whitney Lane

©Kimberley Wiseman

©Kimberley Wiseman

©Oliver Wetter

©Oliver Wetter

©Tracy Mattocks

©Tracy Mattocks

©Aaron Meshon

©Aaron Meshon

©Phil Bliss

©Phil Bliss

©Paul Garland

©Paul Garland

©Dingding Hu

©Dingding Hu

@Barbara Pollak-Lewis

@Barbara Pollak-Lewis

©Chris Kintner

©Chris Kintner

©Vlad Alvarez

©Vlad Alvarez

©Keith Dreier

©Kyle Dreier

©Beatriz Mayumi

©Beatriz Mayumi

©Andreas von Buddenbrock

©Andreas von Buddenbrock

©Urs Knobel

©Urs Knobel

©Charlo Frade

©Charlo Frade

©Daria Kirpach

©Daria Kirpach

©Ellen Weinstein

©Ellen Weinstein

©Gregory Nelson

©Gregory Nelson

©Sergio Baradat

©Sergio Baradat

©Richard Borge

©Richard Borge

Happy Holidays and Merry Christmas from Altpick.com and members!

To see more the Altpick members’ work, please visit: http://altpick.com

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Miami’s Annual Art Basel Week 2016

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On November 28th, Altpick-writer and illustrator, Andreas von Buddenbrock, went to Miami, FL, for the annual  ‘Art Week’. What follows is a description of his experiences and observations, rather than a review of the fairs themselves. Illustrations made for this article only reflect the artist’s personal view of the various artworks presented, and Andreas insists that they should be experienced in real life.

Art is certainly “in the air” as Miami starts one of it’s busiest weeks of the year. Not only is it the week for Art Basel’s annual American outing, but it’s also one for a great number of satellite fairs spread out all over town. As I’m walking along Miami’s South Beach, it’s hard not to notice the gigantic white tents that have been set up on the pale beach sand for exclusive art exhibits such as “Scope” and “Untitled”. Bringing to mind giant, white barns, their elongated shapes rest peacefully along the clear blue ocean front. Everywhere I go, people who have flown in from all over the world seem to be discussing the latest show they saw or the upcoming event they’re going to. As the night rolls in, the sprawling area of Miami Beach becomes even more alive, as bars and restaurants hosting nightly shows and VIP parties fill up with people. It’s a luxurious setting, for sure, but there’s definitely room for everyone; older, established artists and high-end collectors rub shoulders with up-and-coming painters and sculptors, creating a versatile mix of old and new, famous and unknown.

But the star of the show, of course, is Miami Art Basel, showcasing more than 250 galleries from 31 different countries. Hosted inside the ginormous Miami Beach Convention Center, Art Basel serves as the nucleus of this contemporary art week, with visitors pouring in and out of the building’s four major entrances like blood cells moving through a beating heart. After a public opening in Collins Park the night before (including public ‘Ground Control’ -themed performances in honor of the late David Bowie, and grilled food being served from the flaming hood of a limousine), traffic outside the convention center keeps on getting thicker by the hour, as people compete to “up-street” each other in a relentless, and often fruitless, chase for vacant cabs.

Fortunately for us visitors, however, the inside of the fair does not reflect the chaos of the outside world; sure, people stream through the center’s corridors in opposite directions, occasionally bumping into each other with muttered apologies, but the mood in here is much less stressful. Most likely, this can be credited to the setup of the show. The fair, as it turns out, is made up of long hallways that together form a unified set of rectangles, getting smaller in size the further you go towards its core.

It’s a maze, in a sense (“Westworld”, anyone?), but simple enough for only the worst navigator to get lost. At its centre, as well as its very edges, restaurants and cafeterias have been placed for people to eat, drink and re-energize themselves before continuing on with their treks throughout the gigantic art-space. Additionally, this can also be achieved in the various little ‘parks’ that have been placed with great care throughout the show; walled off by knee-high wooden benches, these green knolls of grass and trees form smaller islands between the infinite row of artworks for people to rest their eyes and feet, away from the walking crowd.

a5_2In terms of the art itself, there is certainly a lot to take in – a common criticism about these type of fairs. The sheer amount of art, whether appealing or not, is constantly coming at you from left, right and center and it does at times feel a bit overwhelming. But as much as it may flood the brain with visual information, it can also be argued that these kind of events calls upon a mode of effective screening, regardless of whether you intend to buy or not; it forces you to quickly come to grips with what appeals to you, and what doesn’t.

Not to mention, if you’re an artist, the incredible amount of inspiration that can be found. Art Basel is a fair that, along with its many satellite shows, may help its viewers (if they’re willing to pay attention) understand themselves just a little bit more, and solely for that reason, it’s worth coming back to.

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by Andreas von Buddenbrock – Illustrative Journalist

Photos and Illustrations ©Andreas von Buddenbrock

To see more of Andreas’ work visit his website and Altpick page.

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Illustrators Chris Lyons and David Owens Chat Over Coffee

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©Chris Lyons

 

by  David Owens

I’ve known Chris Lyons for several years now. He’s a brilliant illustrator, designer, and teacher. You’ve probably seen his work before, either in the New York Times, on some HESS truck packaging, or perhaps on one of the Forever Stamps that he illustrated for the Postal Service this year! I was thrilled to interview him and get some insight from an industry veteran.

Q: You’ve been illustrating for a long time; how has the industry changed over the last decade, and what are a few ways in which you stay ‘current?’

A: When I first started out as a freelance illustrator in 2002 (after 20 years in advertising & design), portfolio reviews were still a thing. I remember my reps (Lindgren & Smith) sending me to walk the floors of the Time/Life building with my printed portfolio and promotional post cards! I must admit, I really enjoyed that process. I’m still actually doing work with several AD’s that I met that day. Nothing like face-to-face meetings. With the proliferation of web sites and social media promotions (not to mention overworked, understaffed ADs…) rarely do I actually meet my clients anymore. And no one ever calls for a portfolio to be sent over…

As for staying current – I devour good design inspiration sites (Grain Edit, AIGA, Dieline), informative and interesting blogs and inbox stuffers like Creativity Daily, AdAge and Illustration Daily, and magazines like CA. But the big thing for me is teaching at a great design program like RIT. The kids are bright, talented, and ambitious and so incredibly plugged into contemporary culture and technology that they challenge me to be right there with them every class.

Q: You’ve suggested to me that I present myself to the world with one strong signature style, yet I see on your site a couple of distinctly different styles. What’s the biggest challenge in marketing yourself in two slightly different ways?

A: You know, one of the benefits of doing this for so long is that you develop some nice relationships with Designers and ADs who will want to shake it up and challenge you to surprise them with a different look at something. I’m always up for that. And I’m always excited to see what happens. So some of those are on my site and have generated interest from new ADs to do more of it. All part of the fun. But I tend to promote my natural style in my postcards and emails and sourcebooks.

Q: What are two pieces of advice that you would give young illustrators when entering the field?

A: Keep doing personal work. I know everyone dishing advice to illustrators seems to say that, but I will say some of my favorite and best assignments have come as a result of personal work being seen and referenced. I love creating illustrations for the pure joy of it – and I’ve had a bunch of them get into the CA Illustration Annual

Keep your hand in other things. For me it’s teaching and taking the occasional design project. All those experiences inform the illustrator in me and force me to get out in the world. It’s so easy to get lost in your studio and go hermit…

…………………………………………………………………………………………

©David Owens

©David Owens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

by Chris Lyons

David Owens and I met a few years ago at my “office” (A coffee shop in the village of Pittsford, NY) and we’ve moved from art student/mentor to friends/ colleagues. It’s been a real joy to watch his career develop and blossom. David has the talent and drive to make it in this business and his enthusiasm is infectious – I feel energized after every meeting!

Q: With so many career choices available to young creatives, what made you choose Illustration?

A: To by honest, I was never really one of those illustrators who felt like illustration was the only thing I could bring myself to do. There were lots of other careers that sounded really interesting, particularly art directing. Actually, with a background in graphic design, art directing was more-or-less my plan.

However, by my senior year I was freelancing quite a bit. I loved the freedom. My illustrations were always the strongest part of my portfolio; that’s what I enjoyed and that’s where I found work.

Q: How are you finding your way in this ultra-competitive industry at such a tender age…?

A: Life is a journey. I find that I have to constantly remind myself that it’s not about what I did last year or even what I’ll do next year. I work hard every week at the assignments I have on my desk (or desktop, haha). Those assignments always seem to lead to new assignments, usually better ones. For me it hasn’t been about competing as much as it has to just work hard and be genuine.

Q: And I’ll ask you: what 2 pieces of advice would give young illustrators entering the field?

A: Most young illustrators understand how important it is to have your own style, but style should be developed based on process. In other words: figure out what you enjoy doing not just what you want your work to look like.

Know that it’s ok to do work other than illustration. There’s an unneeded notion in the industry that you have to be illustrating full-time or else you’re a kind of fraud. I’m glad to be able to illustrate full-time, but I did a lot of part time design work in the beginning. You just have to figure out your own path.


owens_profileDavid Owens is a professional illustrator, avid plein air painter, and sometimes pretends to be a pro-cyclist.   If you ever see some guy painting in the Adirondack Mountains, or by Lake Ontario: stop by and say hello, it might be David. Visit David’s page on
 Altpick.com and his website.

 

chris_lyonsChris Lyons professional illustrator and also plays a ton of basketball and spend sunny days in his gardens. His client list includes The NY Times, LA Magazine, Washington Post, MillerCoors, Penguin Publishing, Target, Chicago Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, to name a few. Chris also teach a bit in the School of Design at RIT. Visit Chris’ page on Altpick.com and his website.

 

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Have a Spook-tacular Halloween from Altpick Members!

Altpick.com members stepped up to the Halloween challenge and submitted some awesome images!  Wishing everyone a spirited and fun Halloween!

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To see more of the Artists’ work, please visit Altpick.com.

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Chasing Yachts in the British Virgin Islands with Photographer George Kamper

This gallery contains 6 photos.

Capturing a full photography and video library for The Moorings while sailing the British Virgin Islands sounds like a dream project, and it is, if you know how to handle it.    George Kamper gives us a little back story … Continue reading

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Blair Bunting Recreating Top Gun

Celebrity Advertising Photographer Blair Bunting re-creates Top Gun with fighter jets in California.

Celebrity Advertising Photographer Blair Bunting re-creates Top Gun with fighter jets in California.

It all started with a conversation and a napkin… Standing in the pilot’s lounge at Miramar Base, the very spot where Top Gun filmed the “love and feeling” scene, an idea began. It was a conversation between some friends, myself and one of the pilots (Rob “Scratch” Mitchell) from the Patriots Jet Team. We waxed poetic for hours, drawing out ideas of what it would take to film Top Gun’s scenes without the luxury of the Hollywood green screen. At times the conversation was tense, and at other times we were crying laughing at the ludicrous idea of recreating them ourselves. Unfortunately the latter won out, and this photoshoot was born.

I wish I could go into all the details, but in my attempts to hang with a fighter pilot’s drinking ability left me a bit fuzzy on what was discussed. However, I still had the napkin that outlined a shoot that was dangerous, painful and would become reality in the coming months.

Celebrity Advertising Photographer Blair Bunting re-creates Top Gun with fighter jets in California.

Celebrity Advertising Photographer Blair Bunting re-creates Top Gun with fighter jets in California.

It wasn’t long before I found myself sitting in another fighter jet, the engine starting to whine as the auxiliary power wakes the beast. Moments later the ignition happens and all that enters my mind is “oh fuck, this is happening again.” My mind was flooded with a world of thoughts, everything from checking settings on the camera once more, to the more unnerving one of, “if something happens, I have to jump out of this jet because we disabled my ejection seat so that the camera wouldn’t accidentally hit it and send me and my pilot into the jet we are inverted over.” Even now I look back at that one and it freaks me out.

Back in the cockpit, and the three jets begin to jerk forward, as if they are thoroughbreds fighting the gate to be let out. Within moments, we are screaming down the runway, but unlike my previous flights, there is a jet right beside mine as if we were drag racing, watching the world fade off into a blur. I hear my pilot call for rotation and we are flying. The jet that, only a moment prior was mere meters away from my plane, moves into formation and is now merely feet away. The sight of it is absolutely breathtaking. For those that have not experienced it, I would liken it to being on a boat and watching a large whale jump nearby. It is mesmerizing to see something so large perform so gracefully; I was in awe, both due to the sight and the respect for the men flying the machines. What never crossed my mind in all the years that I have watched planes fly in formation at air shows, is just how much they are moving. Fighting undulations, air pockets and sheer physics, what looks smooth from the ground is nothing less than the last true cowboys carving the air in a dance that in one wrong move could become deadly.

Another thing that was different from my previous flights, was that on this flight I didn’t have a g-suit helping to keep me conscious as gravity tried so hard to take the blood from my brain. Add this to the weight of the Hasselblad H6D with a 35-90mm lenses attached, and my body was getting destroyed at a rate that no gym workout could compare to. Don’t get me wrong, I was having fun, but I was in an immense amount of pain. This was apparent after we landed and saw that the capillaries of my shoulder had exploded from the pressure.

Thirty minutes into the flight we found ourselves at the moment of truth, it was time to find out if we could capture the image that Goose took in Top Gun. In order to do this, my jet would roll inverted at 500 feet off the ground. The second ship would roll in and ever so slowly creep closer, as I tried to take the photo all while calling out positioning to my pilot who relayed the info to the ever closing jet below. If this sounds insanely complicated, that’s because it is.

The preparation that had taken place before this point was equally as immense. I had spent hours laying upside down off the side of my bed in my hotel room the night before so that I could learn how the camera operated while inverted. I went to the gym six days a week and exercised with a trainer that helped me build my endurance while being on top of my hick breathing to stay conscious (check out AGSM for fun). For an hour before we got in the jets I went through neck exercises to see if I could loosen it up enough to look behind myself more or less. All of this work boiled down to a shot that still would be 90% luck.

 

I set the camera to it’s max shutter speed and used the first pass to dial exposure and distance rather than try to get the shot. Dangling by my shoulder straps looking straight down at the Earth speeding by below, a large jet started to emerge. I would call “forward, forward, forward,” and I could see the pilot below as he slowly dialed his plane faster all while looking me right in the eye, it was one of the more surreal moments I have ever been in. From there I would place the front element of the lens (which we had put layers of black tape around) flat against the canopy and shot as fast as the camera could shoot. All the while I was getting a countdown called by my pilot (Scott “Banker” Ind) telling me how many seconds of fuel we had left in the tanks that power the plane specifically while it is inverted. Then he said, “rotation in 10, 9, 8, 7…..” I knew at 3 seconds I had to pull away from the canopy and brace the camera, for if I stayed in position and swung the camera back too hard, I could hit the stick and accidentally fly the plane into the one below. We did this many times, going back and forth over the Northern California terrain until the call came across, “we are at bingo fuel, time to return to base.” To be honest, I had no idea what kind of shot we had, nor did I even look on the flight back, I was too damn tired. At that moment I wanted nothing more than a bottle of water, followed quickly by a glass of scotch.

Looking back on it, I am overwhelmed and grateful. To all the incredible people that put in so much time, effort and money, just to see if something drawn on a napkin was possible, I am eternally grateful. There are so many people that worked on the planes, rigging GoPros to them, making sure they were safe and piloting them, each and everyone of them worth their weight in gold as I consider them family. This job has given me opportunities that I could never dream of and showed me the kindness and support of strangers that I have never earned. I know I say this a lot, but damn do I hope you know how much you all mean to me.

Celebrity Photographer Blair Bunting

Celebrity Photographer Blair Bunting

 

 

 

As you can imagine, this project would not have been possible without the help of many organizations and people I am grateful to call friends:

The Patriots Jet Team: Thank you all so much. You are one incredible family of the kindest people I have met. From Randy to Rings, you are the people that made this possible and I will forever be grateful.
Rob “Scratch” Mitchell: Thank you for standing at the bar table and helping me think up ways to make this happen, planning the flight and piloting it.
Jaron Schneider: Thank you for shooting this one for me. I know the idea of flying in a jet with a hole in the canopy is not the most comfortable situation, but you handled it well while somewhat staying conscious .
Toby Harriman: You are a drone master my friend and a damn hard worker, I genuinely appreciate it.
Hasselblad: Thanks for the camera to use on this one. I hope I didn’t break it as much as it broke me…
Bremont: Thanks for the timepiece that was fitting for this piece. Grateful I didn’t earn the MB the way some have.

Nikon Advertising campaign

by Blair Bunting

To see more of Blair’s work visit his website and Altpick.com page.

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Lowden Adds Depth To Photo-shoot With Touching Back Story

©Scott Lowden

©Scott Lowden

Sometimes, a good back story can help a photo-shoot immensely, adding emotion and sensibility to images in a way that makes the viewer stop and wonder about its subjects. This is something that photographer Scott Lowden did late last year for a personal project, where, except for exercising his ability to shoot high quality photography while keeping the production value as low as possible (in this case limiting himself to only two reflectors), he used a made-up back-story to help come up with shots and video-editing. The result, as can be seen in his video, stills and supporting video files compliment each other, telling the story of two people coming together, despite their very different personalities.

If you’re interested in learning the complete back-story, Scott tells it best himself:

“She’s a writer, he’s a daydreamer…

They were introduced at an art opening, after which they spent the entire evening talking and walking. They’re an about-to-be couple, but they haven’t realized it yet. He’s distracted by work and life and travels, and not giving her the attention she wants. She feels distracted by him, and heads out-of-town to concentrate on a nearly finished project. She has a favorite place, a retreat, where she can concentrate. It’s a hard to get to place, and more importantly, hard to get out of. The kind of place you can only get to by hitching a ride on a friend’s boat.

He woke up on a gloomy morning and she wasn’t around. He realized not having her in his life created a void, something left undone. And it’s not like him to plan, to feel a hole. He’s daydreaming about their time together, and the future…traveling with her, waking up with her, fighting with her. She’s not answering his texts, a few days pass. He knows kind-of where she is, but not exactly, so he goes in search. The drive, the boat, the walk, the retreat.

That’s where our story begins, he grabs his 50s Sea Maid boat and heads out to make his intentions known, and convince her to spend some time with him. He’s a bit melancholy as he’s making his way to her, with a flicker of happiness when he’s with her. It’s like that perfect early evening when the gloom clears and the sun peeks though the cloud cover as they head off on his boat…”


Credits:

Scott Lowden. Photography and Director
Ryan Dickie. DP/Operator
Aurelie Jezequel. Producer
Elodie. Ozanne. Wardrobe Stylist
Pascale Poma. H/M
James Slater. 1st Assistant
Pedro Marti. PA
Kyle Bliss. male talent with Wilhelmina
Svieta. female talent with Marilyn Model Management
Captain Pat. boat captain with sailnewyork.com
Ed Jimenez. Lighting and Grip, Playground Industries
Amy Rosenburg. Editor
Zach Wolfe. Color Grading
Music. A&E (Maps Remix) by Goldfrapp
Shot in Patchogue, NY

For more images and information, please visit Scott Lowden’s website and Altpick page.

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Altpick.com Reports :: July 2016

©Sergio Baradat

©Sergio Baradat

Altpick members news spotlights includes Sergio Baradat, Eddie Guy, Keith Barraclough, Kimberly Wiseman, Ryan Ketterman, Urs. J. Knobel and Paul Garland.  To see more, visit: http://altpick.com/allnews

 

Screen Shot 2016-07-12 at 2.01.39 PMAltpick News:: http://altpick.com/reports/071216/

Altpick.com :: http://altpick.com

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American Illustration 35 – Selected and Chosen Winners Announced!

©Eddie Guy

©Eddie Guy

It’s that time of the year! No, we’re not talking about Christmas, but the annual list of illustrators that have been selected and chosen by American Illustration. This year, we’re proud to announce that the list contains as much as 21 Altpick-members! The full list of members that have been picked are as following:

©Alexei Vella

©Alexei Vella

©Daniel Bejar

©Daniel Bejar

©David Plunkert

©David Plunkert

©Edel Rodriguez

©Edel Rodriguez

©Edel Rodriguez

©Edel Rodriguez

©Ellen Weinstein

©Ellen Weinstein

©Emiliano Ponzi

©Emiliano Ponzi

©Mark Smith

©Mark Smith

©Lara Odell

©Lara Odell

©Ken Orvidas

©Ken Orvidas

©Jon Krause

©Jon Krause

©Joey Feldman

©Joey Feldman

©Hanna Barczyk

©Hanna Barczyk

©Sarah Ferone

©Sarah Ferone

©Mark Smith

©Mark Smith

©Tim O'Brien

©Tim O’Brien

©Oivind Holland

©Oivind Hovland

©Otto Steininger

©Otto Steininger

©David Plunkert

©David Plunkert

©Emiliano Ponzi

©Emiliano Ponzi

©Red Nose Studio

©Red Nose Studio

©Richard Borge

©Richard Borge

©Sarah Ferone

©Sarah Ferone

©Tim O'Brien

©Tim O’Brien

©Tom Cocotos

©Tom Cocotos

©Vlad Alvarez

©Vlad Alvarez

©Ellen Weinstein

©Ellen Weinstein

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Vlad Alvarez
Hanna Barczk
Daniel Bejar
Richard Borge
Tom Cocotos
Joey Feldman                                                                                                                                       Sarah Ferone
Eddie Guy
Oivind Hovland
Jon Krause
Tim O’Brien
David Plunkert
Lara Odell
Emiliano Ponzi
Ken Orvidas
Red Nose Studio
Edel Rodriguez
Mark Smith
Otto Steininger
Alexei Vella
Ellen Weinstein

To learn more about who and what illustrations that have been selected and chosen this year by AI-AP, be sure to follow this link: http://www.ai-ap.com/slideshow/AI/35/#9

To see more of the artists’ work, please visit : Altpick.com

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